At one of Hip Hop’s largest annual events, Hip Hop Caucus is working with activists, academics, and artists to drive social justice and environmental solutions through advocacy and non-partisan electoral organizing

Atlanta, Georgia – October 6, 2017 – This week at one of the world’s largest hip hop festivals,  Hip Hop Caucus has partnered with A3C to train and organize young people on the power of art, music, and hip hop culture advance social justice and civic engagement. Founded in 2005, A3C has grown from a local showcase to become one of the most important hip-hop events of the year, and is commonly referred to as “Hip-Hop’s Family Reunion.”

The Action Summit at A3C powered by Hip Hop Caucus is two days of dedicated programming at the Auburn Avenue Research Library in the center of the festival stages and events in Atlanta. The programing includes a series of events and workshops featuring activists, academics, and artists that explore how to best address social justice challenges through community driven solutions and develop actionable initiatives for young people. Three major tracks for the Action Summit are Police Reform, Getting Out the Youth Vote, and Climate Change and Environmental Justice.

As part of the Action Summit, Hip Hop Caucus joined forces with the Center for Civic Innovation for the A3C Action Pitch National Competition to find, support, and invest in new, innovative ideas that use hip-hop culture as a vehicle to advance social justice and civic engagement. Five finalists will do their final pitches in front of judges and a national audience at the A3C Action Summit this evening. Finalists are competing for $10,000 in cash and business development training. More information on the pitch competition can be found here.

“Social justice movements need innovation and need the energy of young people to drive bold agendas,” said Liz Havstad, COO and Executive Director of Hip Hop Caucus, who will be one of the judges of the Pitch Competition. “Hip Hop Caucus invests in creative communities and young people to be the drivers of change through advocacy and non-partisan electoral organizing, and we are proud to bring empowerment to cultural spaces like the A3C Festival and Conference.”

The Action Summit at A3C powered by Hip Hop Caucus will also feature keynotes from No Malice, formerly of the acclaimed rap duo The Clipse, and Mustafa Santiago Ali, Senior Vice President of Climate, Environmental Justice & Community Revitalization at Hip Hop Caucus.

“At this moment in our country, we must use hip hop – the artform and the culture – to help us organize our collective voices to create change,” said No Malice. “There is a moral voice in Hip Hop that speaks to injustice and struggle, and that is what we are tapping into at the Action Summit at A3C powered by Hip Hop Caucus, and it is what we are tapping into right now in my home state of Virginia to get young people out to vote in our election this November.”

For more information about Hip Hop Caucus at A3C, please visit www.HipHopCaucus.org/A3C and www.a3cfestival.com/action-summit. You can also continue the conversation with us on social media, @HipHopCaucus on everything.

MEDIA CONTACT: Mark Antoniewicz, mark@hiphopcaucus.org, 202-870-8476

ABOUT HIP HOP CAUCUSFormed in 2004, the Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that connects the Hip Hop community to the civic process to build power and create positive change. Through a collaborative leadership network and support of community-driven solutions, HHC focuses on addressing core issues affecting underserved and vulnerable communities. HHC hopes to establish the culture and practice of voting as part of a desired civic lifestyle as well as empower and train leaders and volunteers from our communities to be strategic leaders, messengers, and spokespeople for issues critical to equality, justice, and opportunity.

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Hip Hop Caucus’ non-partisan initiative reaches young voters and voters of color with Virginia cultural influencers issuing a calls to action to register to  vote by October 16th deadline

Washington D.C.Respect My Vote! kicked off a final push to make sure people across the Commonwealth are registered to vote ahead of the November 7th elections. The campaign is promoting young Virginia media, artist, activist and social media influencers as spokespeople.

Last Friday marked the 100th birthday of the civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer and the campaign joined the civil rights community to call for people to honor her by registering to vote. Rev Yearwood, Hip Hop Caucus President & CEO, wrote an op-ed in RVA Magazine connecting her spirit to the importance of voting in the upcoming Virginia elections. This year’s Virginia campaign is being lead by No Malice, formerly of the acclaimed rap duo The Clipse and Virginia Beach native. The deadline to register in Virginia is October 16th, and people can do so by visiting RespectMyVote.com.

For more information and to stay updated, check out:

Respect My Vote! was first launched in 2008 and has since engaged millions of people during election cycles throughout the United States . Through partnerships with nonprofits, businesses, media and entertainment companies, and celebrity spokespeople, the campaign focuses on voter registration, voter education, get-out-the-vote, and voter rights . Spokespeople have included Vic Mensa, T.I., Charlamagne tha God, Keke Palmer, 2 Chainz, Amber Rose, Future, and hundreds of other artists and community leaders. Respect My Vote! is a non-partisan, voter registration, education, and mobilization campaign of the Hip Hop Caucus

Formed in 2004, the Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that connects the Hip Hop community to the civic process to build power and create positive change. Through a collaborative leadership network and support of community-driven solutions, HHC focuses on addressing core issues affecting underserved and vulnerable communities. HHC hopes to establish the culture and practice of voting as part of a desired civic lifestyle, as well as empower and train leaders and volunteers from our communities to be strategic leaders, messengers, and spokespeople for issues critical to equality, justice, and opportunity . More at HipHopCaucus.org.

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MEDIA CONTACT: Mark Antoniewicz, mark@hiphopcaucus.org, 202-506-5882

Hundreds of people gathered for our #RespectMyVote Rally in front of the White House the morning of July 19th to protest Trump’s “Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. The conversation also grew online, as #RespectMyVote rocketed to the #3 trending topic in America on Twitter, and stayed trending all day long. In addition, over a half million people signed petitions pushing back on Trump’s plan to suppress voters, and those petitions were at the rally in front of the White House for delivery.

The commission, more appropriately known as Trump’s “Voter Suppression Commission”, is nothing more than a sham — as noted by the Washington Post — created in response to the blatant false claim of voter fraud in America.

Ever since losing the popular vote by almost three million votes in the 2016 election versus Hilary Clinton, President Trump has been obsessed with proving that there was wide-spread voter fraud. Earlier this year he claimed, without one shred of evidence, that 3–5 million Americans voted illegally during the election.

Now he is out to prove this false claim and is using the power of the Presidency (and your tax money) to set up a which-hunt team full of voter-suppressor all-stars. Each of member of the commission has a long track record of suppressing the vote and blatant attacks on the Voter Rights Act.

Instead of focusing on solutions to ensure more people are able to vote, such as modernizing voter registration, this commission is going to embark on a which-hunt in order to prove a false claim and set up the justification for actions that will make it harder for Americans to vote. They have long decided that those who are the most vulnerable in our country — young people, seniors, people of color — need to have more between them and the ballot box.

Voting is the fundamental right of our democracy. It is a cherished right that our soldiers die for. The United States should be a beacon for democracy throughout the world and lead by example. This new commission completely goes in the the opposite direction.

However, we have seen all of this before. And just as Dr. King and so many others did throughout this country’s history, we are going to fight with everything we have to protect our voting rights. We will always be there to protect voting for all.

We had a very special guest join us for the rally — No Malice, from the legendary hip-hop duo Clipse. No Malice also wrote an article about why he was there. Check out “No Malice Writes Letter ‘Why I’m Rallying at the White House’”. buy Super Cialis

Here’s what the #RespectMyVote Rally and trend online looked like:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Washington, D.C. – Mustafa Santiago Ali, Senior Vice President for Climate, Environmental Justice, & Community Revitalization at Hip Hop Caucus, released the statement below about EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s anticipated move to repeal the Clean Power Plan.

“This backwards move is another clear indication that fossil fuel industry corporations have taken control of the Environmental Protection Agency. It simply does not make sense for our pocketbooks and health. Unfortunately our most vulnerable communities will face the brunt of this irresponsible decision, including disproportionate health impacts, while rich corporations that have control over the EPA will reap the profits.”

“The Trump Administration is failing on its obligation to protect the planet for future generations by ignoring what science is telling us. Without cutting the carbon pollution fueling climate change, we are only going to see stronger storms and more wildfires like the disasters that continue to ravage our country. They are also ignoring the economic opportunities the clean energy economy presents us with, and instead, choose to double and triple down on an already dying industry. The clean energy economy is here and the rest of the world is moving on without us. This puts us at a tremendous economic disadvantage both home and abroad.”

“Hip Hop Caucus urges states to continue carrying out their own plans to cut emissions and transition to 100% clean energy for all. We also urge the public to participate in the upcoming opportunities to refute this irresponsible move through public comment. Instead of favoring polluters, we need to protect the health and prosperity of the American people. Please know that this dangerous move by Scott Pruitt will not be met without a fight.”

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About Hip Hop Caucus: Formed in 2004, the Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that connects the Hip Hop community to the civic process to build power and create positive change. Through a collaborative leadership network and support of community-driven solutions, HHC focuses on addressing core issues affecting underserved and vulnerable communities. HHC hopes to establish the culture and practice of voting as part of a desired civic lifestyle, as well as empower and train leaders and volunteers from our communities to be strategic leaders, messengers, and spokespeople for issues critical to equality, justice, and opportunity. Learn more at HipHopCaucus.org and by following @HipHopCaucus on social media platforms.

About Mustafa Santiago Ali: Mustafa Santiago Ali is a renowned national speaker, policy maker, community liaison, trainer, and facilitator. Mr. Ali specializes in social and environmental justice issues and is focused on a utilizing a holistic approach to revitalizing vulnerable communities. He joined the Hip Hop Caucus after working 24 years at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), where he most recently served as Senior Advisor for Environmental Justice and Community Revitalization. Throughout his career he has worked with over 500 domestic and international communities to improve people’s lives by addressing environmental, health, and economic justice issues.

Landmark bill enhances public health and participation in our democracy, while empowering our most vulnerable communities facing hardships

Washington, D.C. – Mustafa Santiago Ali, Senior Vice President for Climate, Environmental Justice, & Community Revitalization at Hip Hop Caucus, released the statement below about The Environmental Justice Act of 2017, introduced yesterday by U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) and U.S. Rep. Raul Ruiz, M.D. (D-CA). The bill protects against potential executive actions to rollback basic public health protections and public input in decision-making, requires federal agencies to address environmental justice through agency actions and permitting decisions, and strengthens legal protections against environmental injustice for communities of color, low-income communities, and indigenous communities.

“We applaud Senator Booker and Congressman Ruiz for introducing the Environmental Justice Act of 2017 and call for its passage. This is a vital piece of legislation introduced at a time when our most vulnerable communities are under extreme hardships due to the reckless decisions of the current Administration, impacts we are seeing right now from climate change, ongoing disproportionate impacts from air and water pollution, and improper use and disposal of toxic chemicals by industry.”

“The common sense proposals outlined in this bill come from over 25 years of stakeholder engagement and bipartisan input. The bill provides basic protections, legal resources, and tools to empower local communities so that they can take their communities from surviving to thriving.”

“By strengthening our most vulnerable communities, we strengthen America.”

More information about the bill can be found here.

Mustafa Santiago Ali, SVP at Hip Hop Caucus, announcing the bill with Senator Booker and Rep Ruiz – October 24, 2017

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About Hip Hop Caucus: Formed in 2004, Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that connects the Hip Hop community to the civic process to build power and create positive change. Through a collaborative leadership network and support of community-driven solutions, HHC focuses on addressing core issues impacting underserved and vulnerable communities . HHC hopes to establish the culture and practice of voting as part of a desired civic lifestyle, as well as empower and train leaders and volunteers from our communities to be strategic leaders, messengers, and spokespeople for issues critical to equality, justice, and opportunity. Buy Cialis BlackLearn more at HipHopCaucus.org. Follow HHC online @HipHopCaucus on all social media platforms.

About Mustafa Santiago Ali: Mustafa Santiago Ali joined Hip Hop Caucus after working 24 years at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), where he most recently served as Senior Advisor for Environmental Justice and Community Revitalization. Mr. Ali specializes in social and environmental justice issues and is focused on a utilizing a holistic approach to revitalizing vulnerable communities. As a renowned speaker, policy maker, community liaison, trainer, and facilitator, he has worked with over 500 domestic and international communities to improve people’s lives by addressing environmental, health, and economic justice issues.

Washington, D.C. – October 28, 2017 – Rev.  Lennox Yearwood Jr., President & CEO of Hip Hop Caucus, today released the statement below about the “Sandy5” march calling for leaders to take action on climate change and accelerate a just transition to clean energy. 

“We march to remember victims of Superstorm Sandy and say never again. We demand that our leaders act now to address the increasing impacts of climate change and help our communities move from surviving to thriving. Without cutting the carbon pollution fueling climate change, we are going to see stronger storms, like Sandy, Harvey, Irma, and Maria . We need to stop supporting the fossil fuel industry and stand up to the leaders at the federal, state, and local levels that value profit over people. Solutions to climate change exist and we can no longer wait to act – the time is now to protect our communities and the planet for future generations.”

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Washington, D.C. – Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr., President & CEO of Hip Hop Caucus, today released the statement below about the tragic and senseless attack at the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival in Las Vegas last night. The terrorist attack left over 50 people dead and 400 injured, in the most deadly mass shooting in modern United States history.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to all of the victims that lost their lives from this absolute senseless attack. It is hard to comprehend why this would happen and we grieve with the families and friends of the victims in this dark time. They will never be forgotten.”

“We call for a renewed focus and immediate action on America’s gun policies and mental health issues. Weapons created for the battlefield are easily accessible in this country, including high powered rifles with extended magazines. Mental health issues too often go unaddressed and combined with unlimited access to increasingly sophisticated and powerful weapons, we continue to see tragedies unfold. From Columbine High School, to Sandy Hook Elementary School, to Pulse Nightclub, now Mandalay Bay on the Las Vegas strip – enough is enough. Let us come together and call on our elected leaders to take action that is needed to protect us against these senseless acts as much as possible. More can be done. What is it going to take for our leaders to act? How many more innocent people need to die and how many more families need to be destroyed?”

“Music is a unifying force – people attend concerts because of their shared love of music, whether it is country or hip hop. It is truly devastating to see that love and unity at a concert disrupted by such a despicable act. Instilling fear in the public through mass shootings is the definition of terrorism. Let us grieve now and also use this moment to come together to call for meaningful action to protect ourselves, family members, friends, neighbors, and fellow citizens in the future.”

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People’s Climate Music Releases New Single Featuring Jeremih and Antonique Smith to Move People to Act on Climate, Proceeds to Storm Relief Efforts

Cover of the 1969 Beatles iconic song inspires hope to solve climate change and support communities impacted by hurricanes and environmental disaster

Washington, D.C., September 22, 2017 – Today Hip Hop Caucus, creator of People’s Climate Music, debuted “Here Comes the Sun,” on iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify, Tidal and Amazon Music, featuring Grammy nominated singers Jeremih and Antonique Smith. The inspirational track is a cover of the song written by George Harrison that was first released on the Beatles’ 1969 pivotal album, Abbey Road. All profits from the record are being donated to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma relief efforts in frontline communities. Through People’s Climate Music, Hip Hop Caucus organizes diverse and influential artists to create music that inspires action on the climate crisis, with a goal of leading the way to a sustainable, 100% clean energy future for our planet.

Jeremih and Antonique Smith’s interpretation of “Here Comes the Sun” is a message about our humanity, as people of all walks of life come together to help each other in disaster and crises.

“We reprised the song in a way that keeps the essence of the original version, and we appropriated it as a message of hope to those today who are working on the right side of history– for justice, equality, and a healthy planet,” said Jeremih.

The song is accompanied by a call to action for people to take at www.PeoplesClimateMusic.com/HCTS. A promise to band together for the immediate and long-term recovery work from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and to prepare vulnerable communities for climate adaptation and an equitable transition to a clean economy, the project calls on people to use their voices to put pressure on our world leaders to act on climate change now.

“Poor communities and communities of color are impacted first and worst by the climate crisis,” said Antonique Smith. “I’ve traveled across the country meeting with communities on the frontlines of pollution and environmental disasters, and the purpose of our revival of ‘Here Comes the Sun’ is to bring more attention and support to their work and leadership on the frontlines.”

To mark People’s Climate Music’s third anniversary, a trailer for the “Here Comes the Sun” music video featuring Jeremih and Antonique Smith will premiere during Climate Week NYC 2017 at Hip Hop Caucus’ Frontline Communities – The Untold Stories of The Climate Movement event on Sunday, September 24th at The New School.

“With the power of culture and artists who have the ability to reach people everywhere, we are expanding the climate movement,” explained Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr., President and CEO of Hip Hop Caucus. “We must build a movement big enough and powerful enough to drive a transition to 100% clean energy for all. A healthy planet requires justice and equality so that everyone’s communities are clean, healthy, and safe places to live.”

“Here Comes the Sun” is available on all streaming and online stores including iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify, Tidal and Amazon Music. Find the song at: www.PeoplesClimateMusic.com/HCTS For more information about People’s Climate Music visit peoplesclimatemusic.com or to continue the social conversation, visit Facebook.com/hiphopcaucus.

About Hip Hop Caucus (www.hiphopcaucus.org) Formed in 2004, the Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that leverages Hip Hop culture to encourage young people to participate in the democratic process. Through a collaborative leadership network, HHC addresses core issues affecting underserved communities. HHC programs and campaigns support solution-driven community organizing led by today’s young leaders.

About People’s Climate Music (www.peoplesclimatemusic.com) Climate change is the most significant global issue of our time. The adverse impacts of climate change can be seen in unsafe water supplies, disproportionate pollution in poor communities, and extreme weather like hurricanes, heat waves and drought. It’s only going to get worse unless we work together to create a big change. Over the past decade, Hip Hop Caucus has been building support for the climate movement among cultural influencers. People’s Climate Music is a large-scale project that is expanding the base and scope of the climate movement, reaching deeper into popular consciousness to drive climate action among diverse constituencies, and inspiring action.

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HIP HOP CAUCUS PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – September 5, 2017
MEDIA CONTACT – Mark Antoniewicz, mark@hiphopcaucus.org, 202-506-5882

Washington, D.C. – Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr., President & CEO of Hip Hop Caucus, today released the below statement in response to the Trump Administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program:

“We the people will not stand for this Administration’s continued blatant disregard for our most vulnerable communities, cruel actions that will tear apart thousands of families, and fanning of the flames of hate and bigotry. The decision to end DACA today is so cruel, even this Administration decided to wait a few days until after a natural disaster devastated millions of our brothers and sisters on the Gulf Coast to announce it. Ending DACA will certainly be a man-made disaster, one that will have drastic negative implications on America’s families, economy, and moral fabric for years to come. This decision also comes on the heels of Charlottesville, where the whole world saw America’s ugliest side. We will continue to relentlessly counter this hate and bigotry supported by this Administration with love. All power to the people.”

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About Hip Hop Caucus: Formed in 2004, the Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that leverages Hip Hop culture to encourage young people to participate in the democratic process. Through a collaborative leadership network, HHC addresses core issues affecting under-served and vulnerable communities. HHC programs and campaigns support solution-driven community organizing led by today’s young leaders. Learn more at HipHopCaucus.org.

Washington, D.C. – Mustafa Santiago Ali, Senior Vice President for Climate, Environmental Justice, & Community Revitalization at Hip Hop Caucus, today released the statement below about the impacts severe storms have on our most vulnerable communities, and the lack of prioritization and response they receive from this Administration, including recent reports that Administrator Scott Pruitt is relocating the offices of Environmental Justice and National Environmental Policy Act Compliance out of the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. These offices were formed out of a set of recommendations from stakeholders over the years under both Republican and Democratic Administrations. They provide critical expertise, protection of public health, and ensure that input and needs of all communities are fully considered by the agency, including ahead of, during, and following disasters.

“Moving these offices is very alarming, especially in the immediate aftermath of Harvey and looking ahead at Irma. This is another example of how this Administration is dissecting and dismantling the agency with a scalpel to favor industry polluters instead of protecting the health and prosperity of the American people. These actions politicize and weaken these offices, and continue to show a lack of connection to the voices and input from our most vulnerable communities by this Administration. This is at a time when the current leadership should be moving forward on the expansion of these offices to address the vastly disproportionate environmental impacts happening across the country to our most vulnerable communities – including communities of color, low income communities, and indigenous populations.”

“America’s most vulnerable communities are hardest hit and often undervalued, underestimated and marginalized by decision makers following storms like Harvey. For decades communities like Port Arthur and the Manchester neighborhood in Houston have been breathing in heavy toxic air that literally takes their breath away. Following Harvey, they now face even stronger first-hand exposure to harmful and unknown chemicals in their air, water, and land. First responders to the disaster areas are also exposed to these harmful toxins as they put their lives on the line to save lives and property. Vulnerable communities are also not typically prioritized in rebuilding efforts. They are often relocated to the most undesirable areas with the greatest risk to future public health threats and face many disproportionate hurdles as they attempt to recover financially.”

“Unfortunately, thus far the Trump Administration has not shown that they care about our most vulnerable communities. They have also shown an unwillingness to consider the impacts of an increasingly changing climate into their planning, policies, and priority setting for the American people. The current Administration has proposed drastic budget cuts that are not connected to the reality and dangers that vulnerable communities face, or what science is telling us. Their proposed cuts to NOAA, FEMA, EPA, and HUD in particular will have a direct correlation to the preparedness, response, and recovery within these communities hardest hit by Harvey and other severe storms of increasing magnitude, like Hurricane Irma approaching the U.S. mainland.”

“Vulnerable communities are forced into even more desperate situations, where their existing challenges are significantly compounded by these stronger storms and lack of foresight, empathy, and action by this Administration. This is literally putting people’s lives in jeopardy. This is the time we need to recognize the power, solutions, and opportunities to better prepare, respond, and rebuild for all. We need to work together to take our most vulnerable communities from surviving to thriving.”

To support frontline communities recovering from Harvey, please visit #AJustHarveyRecovery and Hip Hop Caucus’ resource page here.

For more, please be sure to check out Mustafa’s latest appearance on AM Joy, video interview with Robert Reich, and interview on the Politically Re-Active podcast with Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu. You can also keep up with him on Twitter (@EJinAction).

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About Hip Hop Caucus: Formed in 2004, the Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that leverages Hip Hop culture to encourage people to participate in the democratic process. Through a collaborative network, HHC addresses core issues impacting under-served and vulnerable communities. HHC programs and campaigns support solution-driven community organizing led by today’s young leaders. Learn more at HipHopCaucus.org. Follow HHC online @HipHopCaucus on all social media platforms.

About Mustafa Santiago Ali: Mustafa Santiago Ali is a renowned national speaker, policy maker, community liaison, trainer, and facilitator. Mr. Ali specializes in social and environmental justice issues and is focused on a utilizing a holistic approach to revitalizing vulnerable communities. He joined the Hip Hop Caucus after working 24 years at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), where he most recently served as Senior Advisor for Environmental Justice and Community Revitalization. Throughout his career he has worked with over 500 domestic and international communities to improve people’s lives by addressing environmental, health, and economic justice issues.

MEDIA CONTACT – Mark Antoniewicz, mark@hiphopcaucus.org202-506-5882

HIP HOP CAUCUS PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – September 3, 2017
MEDIA CONTACT – Mark Antoniewicz, mark@hiphopcaucus.org, 202-506-5882

New Orleans Community, Hip Hop Artists, and Activists Commemorate 12th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Call for a Just Harvey Recovery for All

New Orleans, LA – Today the Hip Hop Caucus, New Orleans Katrina Commemoration Foundation, Nuthin’ But Fire Records, Q93, People’s Climate Music, and many other community partners hosted the 12th Annual Hurricane Katrina March and Second Line.

The day’s events began with a healing ceremony next to the breached levee in the Lower Ninth Ward, followed by a march through the streets which fed into a second line. The second line ended with a rally at Hunter’s Field hosted by Wild Wayne of Q93 and renowned New Orleans’ poet Sunni Patterson. The rally featured remarks and performances by a variety of prominent community and cultural leaders, including Mia X, Sess 4-5, Roi Anthony, Hustlaz, Lady Red, Yung Pro, Shorty, Wildboy Woody, and DJ7.

This event serves as the largest annual community based commemoration of the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and shows first-hand the consequences of climate disasters on our communities. Each year this event honors the resiliency of the people, remembers the lives lost, and encourages further support for the communities most devastated by Hurricane Katrina. This year organizers also called for a just and equitable recovery from Hurricane Harvey which caused widespread flooding in southeast Texas and southwest Louisiana this past week.

“The people of New Orleans will not forget those who were lost 12 years ago and it is incredibly powerful to march in the same streets where your relatives died,” said Rev Yearwood, President & CEO, Hip Hop Caucus. “This anniversary is also a moment of solidarity, as millions are currently being impacted by Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Louisiana. Let us help our brothers and sisters in the Gulf get through this historic event, just as the City of Houston did by taking in over 100,000 people impacted by Hurricane Katrina 12 years ago. In that same spirit, we extend our hands and stand for a just recovery as we begin to heal and rebuild.”

Participants throughout the day also highlighted the ongoing struggle of families to live and thrive in post-Katrina New Orleans. Participants also called on leaders to do more to better prepare our most vulnerable communities to withstand future natural disasters by investing in smarter infrastructure and addressing climate change.

“We will never forget Katrina and what it did to our people,” said Sess 4-5, event organizer, leader of Hip Hop Caucus New Orleans, and recording artist and community activist. “We also want to shine a light on the fact that many people impacted by the storm are still not getting the help they deserve, even 12 years after it hit. We will keep on marching every year to remember those lost, bring our community closer together, and hold our elected leaders accountable so that they can right the wrongs of the past and create a better future for all.” cialis next day delivery usa

Organizers asked participants, supporters, and leaders to:

  • Remember: by calling on the state of Louisiana to make August 29 a holiday commemorating the lives lost in Katrina.
  • Right the wrongs: by calling for racial and economic justice so that in the face of disaster, the poor and people of color are not left without the ability to rebuild communities with good schools, good jobs, and good public health and safety.  
  • Say never again: by calling for action on climate change from our world’s leaders, otherwise we will only see more of these extreme weather events like Hurricane Katrina and Harvey around the world.
  • Call for a just and equitable Harvey recovery and rebuild for all: The most vulnerable communities – including low-income and communities of color – are being hardest hit. Help support by visiting anothergulf.com/a-just-harvey-recovery.

For more options on how to support Harvey recovery efforts, please visit hiphopcaucus.org/hurricane-harvey.  

About Hip Hop Caucus: Formed in 2004, the Hip Hop Caucus (HHC) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that leverages Hip Hop culture to encourage young people to participate in the democratic process. Through a collaborative leadership network, HHC addresses core issues affecting underserved communities. HHC programs and campaigns support solution-driven community organizing led by today’s young leaders. Learn more at HipHopCaucus.org.  

About New Orleans Katrina Commemoration Foundation: New Orleans Katrina Commemoration Foundation annually organizes the largest community-led remembrance event on the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, August 29th.

About the People’s Climate Music: People’s Climate Music is helping to expand the climate movement by organizing diverse and influential artists to create music and culture that inspires action to solve the biggest crisis humanity has ever faced – climate change. More at PeoplesClimateMusic.com.

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Our democracy and communities were under attack in 2017, but you fought back with us…

Hip Hop Caucus keynote address in Chicago — December 2017

Our justice, health, education, civil and human rights, environment, security, economic opportunity, and moral compass were all dramatically undercut and damaged by our elected leaders in 2017.

The inequality gap also continued to widen. Those at the top continue to flourish and build their fortunes, like an heir who just became $75 billion dollar richer from the tax bill that Congress just passed. While families without financial means and opportunities continue to be looked-over and marginalized, like the 13 year-old boy who collected cans to buy his mom a Christmas gift.

In 2017 Hip Hop Caucus was at the frontlines of the Resistance, fighting for a better future for all.

Rally on Capitol Hill for the health of our communities and planet — June 2017
Helping our friends launch the AFRICANS RISING movement in Senegal — June 2017
We helped announce U.S. Senator Cory Booker and Congressman Raul Ruiz’s “Environmental Justice Act of 2017” bill on Capitol Hill — October 2017
We led the #RespectMyVote rally in front of the White House, as Trump’s “Voter Suppression” commission met for the first time — July 2017
We led the #RespectMyVote rally in front of the White House, as Trump’s “Voter Suppression” commission met for the first time — July 2017
No Malice from The Clipse led our Respect My Vote! efforts for the elections in Virginia.

Hip Hop Caucus is optimistic for the future, but we know real change never comes easy. It is going to take our collective action, recognition of our power, and perseverance to make the difference.

Let’s hit back even harder in 2018 — donate to our movement now!

Your donation brings us one step closer to building a national platform for hip hop that educates, engages, and mobilizes under-served communities in the civic, social, and political processes. Help us influence a nation shaped by the voice and support of constituents and donors like you.

Thank you for staying involved on behalf of our communities and culture. All power to the people!

A3C Action Summit — October 2017
Our Virginia Respect My Vote team, led by No Malice, visited colleges ahead of the November elections in the Commonwealth.
Our Senior Vice President, Mustafa Santiago Ali, held a discussion with Al Gore at Netroots Nation — August 2017
Congressional Black Caucus Annual Conference Event — September 2017
We fought for environmental and climate justice!
We helped promote and encourage people to vote for “Stand Up / Stand N Rock #NoDAPL” to win a MTV Video Music Award. The amazing song and video focuses on the injustices facing our Indigenous brothers and sisters at Standing Rock and the need to get off of the fossil fuels causing climate change. — August 2017
Supporting DC Mayor Muriel Bowser as she signed a Mayor’s Order reaffirming Washington, DC’s support of the Paris Climate Accord. — June 2017
People’s Climate Music event with Antonique Smith and Adrian Grenier at Climate Week NYC 2017 — September 2017
Members of our team visiting with our good friend Gina McCarthy, former Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Members of our team paying close attention to nomination hearings on Capitol Hill — June 2017
No Malice joined us for the #RespectMyVote Rally in front of the White House — July 2017
Members of our team pose for a pic following a Protect the Arctic Rally on Capitol Hill — December 2017