Categories
Think 100

Episode 42: “Climate Avoiders and their Enablers” [February 19, 2019]

We cover the first hearing in the U.S. House of Representatives on Climate Change in 10 years. It was held on February 6th, by the Natural Resources Committee. Our own co-host Rev Yearwood testified. His message was challenged by a frontman for the fossil fuel industry, Derrick Hollie of Reaching America, who travels the country claiming the transition to clean energy is bad for African Americans. Rev Yearwood handedly took down Mr. Hollie’s claims. In this episode we look closer at the tactics used by climate change avoider lawmakers and their enablers to delay climate action. We also hear from others who testified, including Nadia Nazar of Zero Hour; Elizabeth Yeampierre of UPROSE and the Climate Justice Alliance; Dr. Kim Cobb of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology; Paula DiPerna, of CDP North America; and, climate denier Dr. Judith Curry of Climate Forecast Applications Network. Additionally, Congressman McEachin of Virginia shares behind the scenes insights with us about the hearing.

Categories
Uncategorized

Episode 41: “State of the Climate Movement” – Pt.2

In part two of our special  “State of the Climate Movement” series, our host is joined by a group of prominent activists and experts to continue the conversation on lack of diversity in mainstream environmental NGOs and Foundations. Guests give testimonials on what it’s like to be a person of color at an environmental organization and discuss solutions to strengthen our collective effort for thriving communities and a healthy planet. Special guests include Dr. Michael Dorsey, Dr. Adrienne Hollis, Rosemary Enobakhare, and Kristin Mink.

Categories
Uncategorized

Episode 40: “State of the Climate Movement” – Pt.1

In part one of our special “State of the Climate Movement” series, our hosts are joined by Green 2.0’s Whitney Tome and Erika West to discuss their new eye-opening report that shows that the lack of racial and ethnic diversity at traditional environmental non-profit organizations and foundations is actually getting worse. Mainstream environmental organizations and foundations are in serious trouble and will only be successful if they address their lack of diversity and recognize the power of being able to reach outside of its traditional boundaries and make-up. Their decline in diversity is not good for our collective ability to win on climate change, but there are solutions. Find Green 2.0’s report at DiverseGreen.org.